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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  January 14, 2017 8:00am-9:01am GMT

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hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the prime minister says gps in england must extend their hours to ease pressure on accident and emergency services. theresa may says funding to doctors will be cut if they don't provide a 12 hour, seven—day service, or prove that it isn't needed. good morning. it's saturday, 14th january. ask also ahead, thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes, but towns and villages along the east coast escape serious flooding. mps call for the government to publish its brexit plan by mid february at the latest. in sport, chelsea, drop their top scorer costa. he not fit or is it the great call
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of china? the aspiring photographer whose pictures went undiscovered for decades, but have now become the cover art for a new album from the jam. and louise lear has the weather. good morning. it is a cold and frosty start to the day, but it is a quieter story in comparison to of late. there will be some coastal showers around, but further inland there will be some sun. good morning. the prime minister has said gps in england should keep their surgeries open for longer to ease pressure on accident and emergency departments. downing street says too many family doctors are closing early and failing to open at weekends, forcing patients to seek treatment in hospitals. our political correspondent chris mason reports. for days, the government has faced a blizzard of criticism about its management of the nhs in england. targets missed, major alerts declared. seniorfigures in the health
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service are sounding doom—laden about the future. now the prime minister is turning her attention to family doctors and what they can do to help. a downing street source said, "most gps do a fantasticjob. however, it's increasingly clear that a large number of surgeries are not providing the access that patients needs and that patients are suffering as a result because they are then forced to go to a&e to seek care". the doctors‘ union, the british medical association, said the remarks amounted to scapegoating during what it called "a very serious crisis." the association added that a third of gp surgeries in england there are thousands of gps out there visiting people in their homes. we provide a 365 day service and it is almost an insult to the hard—working gps that are propping up the nhs on a daily basis. the association added that a third of gp surgeries in england
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had unfilled vacancies because the existing workload put doctors off wanting to go into general practice. let's talk now to our political correspondent tom barton, who is in our london newsroom. we have had all week the stories about the nhs. now the spotlight from first lady on gps? right, charlie. earlier in the week we heard that too many patients in november waited more than four hours at a&e. then on friday, we heard that in the first week of this year, four out of ten hospitals in england declared a major incident on at least one day. now, today's announcement is really an attempt by downing street to show that they are dealing with this issue. officials say that as many as a third of patients who show up at a&e would be better off dealt with elsewhere in the nhs. ministers see gps as key to
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reducing demand on hospitals and so, they're planning reducing demand on hospitals and so, they‘ re planning to reducing demand on hospitals and so, they're planning to ask gps to stay open for longer. there is a threat that if they don't, they could see some of their funding reduced. that if they don't, they could see some of theirfunding reduced. the language that we've heard overnight from number ten is pretty strong. they say patients are suffering because surgeries aren't providing the access that they need and there is also an accusation that even where there are weekend and evening appointments available, gps aren't telling their patients about them. now, doctors are furious about this. the british medical association, as you heard in chris' report, accusing the government of scaremongering. while the conservative mp sarah wollaston who is a gp herself, said this is an attack on overstretched and demoralised doctors. the east of england has escaped major flooding, despite fears that storm surges
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could hit towns along the coast. thousands of people were urged to leave their homes as the environment agency issued 17 severe flood warnings for yesterday evening. but by the early hours of the morning the threat had subsided. simon clemison reports. after all the words of warning, just the sight and sound of a huge display of strength by nature. within five or ten minutes it was coming over the walls was just flooding straight in. it just started running all the way down the street. it was awful. about 30 homes were inundated here in hornsey. businesses too. into the evening, people in the path of the storm surge were still trying to protect their properties. many had been advised to leave, but some in great yarmouth were keen to stay put. we saw this all happen in 2013. you have to take precautions at the end of the day. all we are doing is putting sandbags near the doorways. others found comfort however they could as special rest centres opened up. but when high tide arrived in each town, conditions appeared to ease. the environment agency had sent
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in pumps and more than five miles of temporary barriers. officials insist the emergency response was not over the top. the worst appears to be over. the defences have held. the rest centres will be laid off now. to be honest with you, if that had of breached, we would have been in a lot worse situation in these centres would have been needed. it's wise to say that we followed everything by the book as far as the environment agency and emergency services were concerned that. some are now beginning to return home. but with storm warnings still in place, people are being urged not to take chances. the government should publish its brexit plan by mid february at the latest, according to a cross party group of mps. the exiting the eu committee also says parliament should be given a vote on the final deal.
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here's our business correspondent, joe lynam. next week, theresa may will give a major speech on britain's future outside the eu, which could give us more detail on what kind of brexit she'll be seeking. she is under pressure from key parties in the commons, including leavers such as michael gove. the brexit committee says this: it should set out its planned by mid—february. it should press for a transitional arrangement with the eu if it cannot get a full deal in the two—year time frame. banks in the city should have continued unfettered access to eu markets. crucially they said the government should offer mps a vote on whatever is agreed at the end of the negotiation. we are made up of people who campaigned for leave and remain. the commitee have come together because we know whatever side we took in that debate,
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we need the best deal for britain. the government said: but this report by cross—party mps is likely to be seized upon by those hoping for a softer and certainly more transparent exit from the eu. in a few minutes, we'll speak to hilary benn, the chair of the committee that is calling for mrs may to have a clear brexit plan. that's at 8.10am. jeremy corbyn will defend his leadership of the labour party today after claims by a centre—left think—tank it was too weak to win an election. the fabian society warned labour would lose out on returning to power unless it could secure a coalition. at a speech in london, mr corbyn will say his party offers "a complete break from a rigged system". he'll also outline labour plans to bring care homes into public ownership. president—elect, donald trump, has said he's willing to work with russia and china,
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providing they co—operate. mr trump said the recently imposed sanctions on russia would remain in place for the coming months, but could be lifted if moscow helped washington in the war against islamic extremism. he said the one china policy, under which the us no longer acknowledges taiwan, was up for negotiation. the us house of representatives has voted to begin the process to abolish president obama's health insurance laws known as obamacare. the senate approved the measure on thursday. the law provides medical coverage for more than 20 million americans, but president—elect donald trump has tweeted that obamaca re "will soon be history". banks still need to do more to improve their day—to—day services, particularly when it comes to being clear about fees and charges, according to a customer satisfaction survey. which? found several of the biggest banks such as rbs, natwest and hsbc came out bottom. the consumers' association say banks are doing better with mobile banking, but could improve in other areas.
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well, banks need to do much better when it comes to the transparency of their fees and charges. when it comes to the transparency of theirfees and charges. it when it comes to the transparency of their fees and charges. it is when it comes to the transparency of theirfees and charges. it is really important so that people know how much they're being charged for their bank account. so they know how much they could save if they move to another account and so they don't get hit with unexpected fees and charges. police in the united states say a girl who was stolen as a newborn from a hospital in florida 18 years ago has been found alive in south carolina. this is kamiyah mobley as a baby. until friday, she was living under another name. authorities say she's in good health but overwhelmed. her kidnapper, who posed as a nurse at the hospital where she was born has been charged. a 22—year—old tortoise who has arthritis has been fitted with a set of wheels to help him get around. let's take a look. bert, the african spurred tortoise, uses the wheels instead of his back legs and can now move unassisted.
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he was struggling previously. he's trundling happily around his home at the dinosaur adventure park in norwich. do you know how he ended up getting arthritis? he was sent off to a breeding centre and got a bit too amorous and ended up causing a bit of damage to himself and that's how he ended up in this position in the first place! do you want to stop explaining that now? i don't think i need to go into any more detail. the viewers' imaginations can dot rest! since theresa may declared "brexit means brexit" last summer there's been little official clarification on what that really means. now, a group of mps say the prime minister needs to publish a clear plan for the terms of how britain will leave the european union. the exiting the eu committee also wants mps to have the chance to debate and vote on the proposals
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before they're presented to brussels. hilary benn chairs the committee and joins us now. good morning to you. good morning. so just tell us why do you want the details to be published in mid—february? what's the help to it us mid—february? what's the help to it us to know that then? we are about to embark on the most significant negotiation this country faced in decades. the outcome will affect every single one of us wherever we live in the country. we're not asking the government to reveal its negotiating tactics and its red lines and fall back positions. are regoing to stay in the customs union oi’ regoing to stay in the customs union or not, what's going to happen with the single market, what will happen to eu citizens here and brits abroad, how will we continue to operate on defence, foreign policy, the fight against terrorism? how can we make sure we don't return to ta riffs we make sure we don't return to tariffs in trade between britain and the other countries because that would not be good for business. we say as a committee today, either for businesses in britain or the european union and we think it is important that the government should set that out before it tells the 27,
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the other member states and just to be clear the vote that we're asking for is at the very end of the process when a deal has been negotiated, that's the vote we're calling for. when this has been concluded, in 2019, the european parliament is going to have a vote on the deal. the other member states will decide and we think the british parliament should have the chance to look at the deal that's been negotiated and decide what it thinks of it. what that effectively means, on the vote issue specifically, is that you want the right to be able to say that we won't go ahead with brexit as planned ? to say that we won't go ahead with brexit as planned? because it can't be both. if you reject the deal on the basis of it, if it is a vote of parliament and you reject the deal then the brexit is halted at that point? no, that's not the case because once article 50 is triggered, you're on a two year timetable and unless all the countries, britain and the other 27, agree to extend the negotiating
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period, after two years you're out with whatever you've got or not got. so, parliament, if it were to vote down the deal, then we might leave with no deal. now that's something that parliament would have to think carefully about at the time. in that case, the explanation you give there, makes it sound if at that point in time, with a deal presented to you by theresa may, agreed in brussels, if mps at that stage voted to veto that deal, you're sending us, ithink to veto that deal, you're sending us, i think by your own admission, into some kind of trading oblivion? well, it depends when the vote is... you said at the end of the process. yes. but it depends how near to the end. well, you tell us. what are you asking for? well what, the committee is asking for is clarity about what oui’ is asking for is clarity about what our future trading relationships are going to be. you said at the end of the process... this is a matter of principle. the european parliament will have a votement now, theoretically, the european
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parliament could say we don't like the deal we would be out with no deal at allment it is a matter of principle that if this there, is the most significant change, that parliament should have a right to say what it thinks of the deal. of course, parliament will have to weigh up, is there any chance of getting anything better from the 27 member states or is this the only thing we're going to get, but it is a matter of principle that we should have the right to say yes, we're agreeing, it is not about this preventing us from leaving the european union. when the clocks runs out, we're out. you decided what you'd like from the government. have you'd like from the government. have you got any power to get them to do it? you can suggest this, but it could be ignored, couldn't it? well, we hope the government will respond c011 we hope the government will respond con cluctively. we are made up of leavers and remainers during the campaign, but we've come together because the decision has been made and ourjob, the nation'sjob is to get the best deal for britain and
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the report has particular force precisely because it has been agreed by people who were leavers as well as remainers. i hope the government will look very seriously at the recommendations that we have made because our task is to take evidence, to scrutinise what's going on. at this stage what the government's objectives will be nor the negotiations. why didn't you wait until after theresa may's statement next week, i believe it is tuesday, she is going to make a statement on this. why not wait and then determine whether or not you're satisfied at that point? well, we started a process of drawing up a d raft started a process of drawing up a draft report. it is only recently we discovered the speech she said she will make will be next tuesday. it is just the way the timetable worked out. yesterday we heard tristram hunt saying he's resigning as labour mp in stoke causing a by—election. there has been some, lots of people talking about what this actually means for the labour party. the mood in the party at the moment. some are saying it is because he wasn't
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confident aboutjeremy saying it is because he wasn't confident about jeremy corbyn saying it is because he wasn't confident aboutjeremy corbyn being able to win an election. what is your thoughts on it? as tristram said yesterday, for him, this is a dream job. what's the mood said yesterday, for him, this is a dreamjob. what's the mood like in the labour party? he is a distinguished academic and historian and he said he couldn't pass up the opportunity to become the director of royal albert museum. we wish him every su ccess in of royal albert museum. we wish him every success in his newjob and we have a by—election to win. every success in his newjob and we have a by-election to win. do you thinkjeremy corbyn will be prime minister? well, the british people will make that... no, but what do you think? i want labour government. i'm desperate for a labour government in this country, but you only win in politics if you can win the public‘s trust and confidence and we've got a big challenge on our hands and in the end, it is about putting forward policies that will address the challenges and the problems that people can see at a time of great turmoil in british politics, right across europe, and across the atlantic in the united states of america. one answer you could have given to the question, do
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you thinkjeremy corbyn will be prime minister is yes. the british people decide that. i mean, it's not for anyone to say yes, i know what the outcome of the next election is going to be. it's our responsibility to supportjeremy in trying to make sure that labour wins that election, but you know what the british people decide. thank you very much for your time this morning. it's 8.18am. now the weather. just look at suffolk. it is a beautiful morning and it is cold out there. temperatures are struggling. this little fella running down through the north sea could bring in sleet and snow showers. so it is a cold and frosty start for many of us. the frost will lift, we will see lovely spells of sunshine
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coming through and the strong winds will ease a little, but the risk of a few showers particularly across east anglia where if we get a few together, we could see a centimetre. further west, the wind will drive in some showers, but these will be of rain as we see temperatures sitting around seven and eight celsius. some sunshine. further east, a cold afternoon. two or three celsius at the best. northern ireland, you're in the milderair, the best. northern ireland, you're in the milder air, but showery. six 01’ in the milder air, but showery. six or seven celsius here. but for the bulk of scotland, it is a quieter day. the winds easing down and some sunshine coming through. the east is the favoured spots for the clear skies. for cloud for swansea and maybe the risk of showers here as well. as we go through the overnight period, it is the clear skies that will continue for a time and a frost is likely here yet again, but milder air pushing in from the west on a weather front. on the leading edge for a weather front. on the leading edge fora time, we weather front. on the leading edge for a time, we could see some snow. it is expected to turn back to rain as we go through the night, but as
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it bumps into the cold air, it could be tricky for an hour or so and then it will drift steadily eastwards. so milder air, this tucking itself in behind the weather fronts, but it stays chilly across east anglia and the south east corner. so a little bit of wet snow is not out of the question and a miserable day. it will feel grim, but the rain is not too heavy, it will be persistent. a lot of low cloud and drizzle. soa lot of low cloud and drizzle. so a difference in the feel. nines to 11 celsius generally out to the west, but across the east, cooled. two celsius in east anglia with the cloud and the drizzle. not very good. back to you two. louise, thank you very much. there were concerns last night could bring misery to thousands of residents along the east coast of england. we'rejoined now by alex dunlop, who is in great yarmouth this morning. there were concerns about problems where you are and other places as well. what emerged overnight?
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well, this is where the danger spot was. this is the river where a lot of properties were at risk. at 9.30pm last night, there was a swirl of mass of water about two finance feet. but that's as high as it got and it started to recede. the authorities say that no river defences were breached which is a good sign. just take a look at our high shot. you can the river on your left. if we pan across to the right. you can see left. if we pan across to the right. you can see houses a left. if we pan across to the right. you can see houses a few feet away from the river. those lights are coming on there, but at last night, at 9.30pm, a lot of the lights were 0h at 9.30pm, a lot of the lights were on which showed that a lot of people had decided to stay at home and that's despite the best efforts of the police and the raf teams who knocked on their doors saying, "please get over to the evacuation rest centres. " "please get over to the evacuation rest centres." you can see where a lot of those local people came. this isa lot of those local people came. this is a sandbagging area. a lot of sand
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was piled up here last night. a lot of frenetic activity as people took sand back to their homes and barricaded their doors. along the east coast, we appear to have seen the worst of the flooding evaporate really. many communities escaped the worst of it. however, in the north of england, there was some ice related flooding. some businesses and properties and local roads were affected, but nothing too dramatic. certainly some incidentses in yorkshire. i spoke to one local councillor who said look, we were right to do what we did. we didn't overrea ct. right to do what we did. we didn't overreact. we had to prepare for the worst. at the latest news we've got is there were 17 severe flood warnings, that's been dropped to no severe flood warnings. there are now 80 flood warnings in place, but that's down from 135, to 80, so the worst does appear to be over. alex, thank you very much. you're watching breakfast.
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it's 8.23am. let's look at the newspapers. helen pidd the guardian's north of england editor, is here to tell us what's caught her eye. first let's look at the front pages. the front page of the times, the main story there, indeed our lead story, theresa may ordering gps to stay open for seven days a week, saying it is one of the reasons why a&e units are facing so many stresses and problems. the guardian. there is a picture of the former husband of princess margaret, lord snowden who died yesterday. the eu's chief brexit negotiator is showing the first signs of backing away from his hard—line approach after admitting he wants a deal. the daily mirror.
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an extraordinary story from the united states of a baby girl snatched 18 years ago from hospital, 110w snatched 18 years ago from hospital, now found by police living 200 miles away in florida. waiting to find out whether she will be reunited with her parents, but missing for 18 yea rs. her parents, but missing for 18 years. kidnapped by someone who took her as a newborn baby from hospital. the daily telegraph leads with a story we have been talking about which is about gp surgeries. they must open seven days a week and give patients aids pointments when they wa nt patients aids pointments when they want orface patients aids pointments when they want or face funding cuts. theresa may attempts to relieve the pressure, as she sees it, on crisis—hit accident and emergency unit. the mail is focussing on the gp story and that suggestion from theresa may, indeed, an orderfrom theresa may, indeed, an orderfrom theresa may, indeed, an orderfrom theresa may, that they should be offering appointments seven days a week. helen, hello. thank you for joining us. shall we have a look at
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what you picked out for us? i might get charlie to help me with this one. yes, this is a simple, but startling investigation by the daily mail today. they've decided to test how easy it is to hire a private plane and fly from calais where the so—called jungle was until it was cleared and land at a small british airfield. they decided to do this because a pilot was jailed for people smuggling after setting up this route. sue reid chartered a plane for £1222 along with a photographer and had to fill in article and form and didn't have to provide photo id, she put on the wrong passport number to see if it would flag, if any alarm bells would be raised. she went over to calais and got on the plane and flew to kent and got off the plane and nobody checked her desk and she said, "can you get me a taxi to london and off she went." there was no passport control? no, there was no passport control? no, there was no passport control? no, there was no passport controlment this
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airport, what was it called? lid airport. the daily mail is right, it raises serious questions. although £1220 is a lot of money, it is not a lot when you think of people paying £10,000 to hide in the back of a lorry to come in that route. so it is quite embarrassing for the government and no doubt, as a result of this article, you would expect... things will change because of it. the story is linked to the brexit issue, what will happen? you heard hilary benn talking about asking more questions about what this will mean for people who live here and also who live in other parts of europe? the truth is we don't know. this is a story about a dutchwoman, from devon, she has been in the uk for 30 years and has got three children and a british husband and applied for citizenship and told by the immigration minister in a letter that there was no guarantee that she
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could stay. at the nub of this is an argument over health insurance. so officially in order to get citizenship now, eu citizens are supposed to have comprehensive sickness insurance, but people like this woman say, well, i have been paying into the british tax system for 30 years and that's how we fund the healthcare in the uk. the nhs is funded by taxpayers money. so is it fair that she should have had private healthcare fair that she should have had private healthca re instead ? fair that she should have had private healthcare instead? people like her are being used as negotiating capital. that's the word that robert goodwood uses. we know, the prime minister, will be making a speech and some people are hoping some of those issues might be addressed. the next story. this is about an arts centre in manchester. it is putting the spotlight on global arts. this is called the factory. i think this is fantastic. for too
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long arts funding has been focussed 0h long arts funding has been focussed on london at the expense of the north and other regions. so it's £110 million it will cost. it has been designed by the architect rem coolhouse. the government put £78 million into that which is a serious amount of money and manchester's council leader said it will make manchester a genuine culture counterbalance to london. it has got to be helpful. some people would argue in terms of actual cultural contributions, manchester amongst many other places in the uk, does that anyway? yes. you don't need a building to do it, but that might be lovely. you could say that, but at the same time there is no reason why london should always be getting the fa ncy london should always be getting the fancy new extensions or the garden bridges and many tens of millions that's going to be spent. why shouldn't it be spent up here? we're
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out of time. you're going to come back later and talk about air fares against train fares? yes. i think amongst other things. we will see you ina amongst other things. we will see you in a bit. thank you. stay with us, the headlines are coming up shortly. hello this is breakfast, with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. coming up before nine, louise will have the weather. but first, a summary of this morning's main news. the prime minister has said gps in england should keep their surgeries open for longer to ease pressure on accident and emergency departments. downing street says too many family doctors are closing early and failing to open at weekends, forcing patients to seek treatment in hospitals. those practices could face losing the extra funding they currently receive for offering a seven—day service but the british medical association says gps are already over—stretched. lets not forget, as we are speaking,
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there are thousands of gps out there visiting patients at home. we provide a 24/ seven, day service. it is those gps who are propping up the nhs ona is those gps who are propping up the nhs on a daily basis. the main alert that needs to be recognised is the alert for general practice. the east of england has escaped major flooding, despite fears that storm surges could hit towns along the coast. thousands of people were urged to leave their homes as the environment agency issued 17 severe flood warnings for yesterday evening. by the early hours of the morning the threat had subsided, but the flood warnings remain in place and authorities continue to urge caution in affected areas. a clear plan for brexit should be published by february at the latest — that's the call from a group of mps. the exiting the eu committee is also calling for the prime minister to allow a vote in parliament on the plans before they're presented to brussels.
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the government says it will set out its plans by the end of march. it's a matter of principle that parliament should have a right to decide what it thinks of the deal. parliament will have to weigh up if there is any chance of getting anything better from the 27 there is any chance of getting anything betterfrom the 27 member states, or is this the best we're going to get? the labour leaderjeremy corbyn will say his party would take care homes into public ownership, rather than see them close because of financial difficulties. at a speech in london, he'll say the social care system is at "serious risk of breakdown" unless the government invests more money. he's due to speak at an event for the fabian society. the left of centre think tank that recently said the labour party was too weak to win elections under mr corbyn. president—elect donald trump has said he's willing to work with russia and china, providing they co—operate. mr trump said the recently—imposed sanctions on russia would remain in place for the coming months, but could be lifted if moscow helped washington in the war against islamic extremism.
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he said the one china policy, under which the us no longer acknowledges taiwan, was up for negotiation. the us house of representatives has voted to begin the process to abolish president obama's health insurance laws, known as obamacare. the senate approved the measure on thursday. the law provides medical coverage for more than 20 million americans, but president—elect donald trump has tweeted that obamaca re "will soon be history". police in the united states say a girl who was stolen as a newborn from a hospital in florida 18 years ago has been found alive in south carolina. this is kamiyah mobley as a baby. until friday she was living under another name. authorities say she's in good health but overwhelmed. her kidnapper, who posed as a nurse at the hospital where she was born, has been charged. horse racing could be set for a funding boost as the government reforms the betting levy, which the british horse racing authority say could add
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£30 million to the sport. for the first time, bets being taken by overseas online firms will have to pay back 10 per cent of the profits they make from uk customers. it's hoped it will come into force in april. scientists have found a deep sea treasure with the first sighting of a ruby sea—dragon in the wild. researchers filmed the brightly coloured creatures in western australia. it's the first time the 10—inch—long fish has been seen alive. it was declared a new species in 2015, making it only the third known sea dragon species. it must be related to a sea horse, surely. it is rather calming! i love the creatures you find at the bottom of the oceans. the pig squid
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has always fascinated me. it looks like a cross between a pig and a squid, really! that is why it was named that. we'll find a picture for next time. chelsea, just when it seemed they we re chelsea, just when it seemed they were heading for the title, there top scorer, diego costa, has been left at home because of a dispute over, officially, his fitness, but then there is all the talk about the great call of china, and the chinese money. it follows a disagreement with a coach over his fitness. but the news comes amid reports that he's been the subject of an offer from a chinese club, who could be willing to pay him £30 million a year. that's £577,000 a week.
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there will be tributes, around grounds this weekend to remember graham taylor. the first match in the premier league, sees third place tottenham, play west bromwich albion. spurs are hoping to build on their victory against chelsea last week, and not repeat, the dip in form, which followed their earlier win, against manchester city. it was a fantastic victory. after chelsea, it is a great opportunity to show that we can keep the momentum. that will be key. tottenham's north london rivals arsenal are currently outside the top four. they're playing bottom club swansea city later. it's swansea manager paul clement's first match in charge, and his rather longer—serving counterpart, arsene wenger, has been talking about the challenge facing him.
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iam i am looking forward to it. it has been a big ambition of mine to manage in this league at this level. the first home game with swansea, going up against arsenal is going to bea going up against arsenal is going to be a special moment for me. ahead of football focus, dan walker is here with us. now, look, if it's true that the premier league's top scorer has had his head turned by the great call of china and £30 million a year — 600,000 a week — where does this end? we have been saying for years that china will be able to attract the biggest names. in china, it is state sponsored football fandom. they are trying to produce a brilliant standard of football, and they've got money. i think this is going to continue to happen. if someone came to you and offered you an awful lot
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of money to do the same job somewhere else... you wouldn't go because you love the bbc, but it is something that will turn a lot of people's heads. i don't want to rule things out entirely, that's all i'm saying! charlie leaves the door open. you also have this situation where west ham's best player is not playing. there is loads to talk about today. we have matt phillips, who has been brilliant at west bromwich albion, and paul pogba, talking about jose bromwich albion, and paul pogba, talking aboutjose mourinho, life at manchester united. also lots of nonsensical stuff as well. look at this. where are you on the list in the dressing room in terms of putting the music on?”
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the dressing room in terms of putting the music on? i am working my way up. who is the best answer? the other ones, you don't want to ask them. they will say paul pogba? probably. looking very relaxed. if you follow him on instagram, you will know he has some special moves. he also has his own emoji. yuna w -- you know that you have arrived when you know that you have arrived when you have your own emoji. we will be reflecting on the life of graham taylor. we will look back on his life and his career. i know that you knew him as well. he was so kind, so
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generous. he always asked about family, told you about his family. in football, where so many people are obsessed with results and success , are obsessed with results and success, he was a real nice man who made a difference to everyone he met. completely without ego. that is a wonderful way to describe him. we are always short on time, but the amazing thing about graham was, he had this huge disappointment with england, where he so wanted to take the country he loved to a world cup, but he was never bitter about that, even though people wrote some horrible things about him. he was just disappointed that as a football lover, he could not do more. thanks, dan. leeds united have moved up to third in the championship, after a 1—0 win over derby at elland road. they're now four points off the automatic promotion places. chris woods' headerjust before the break was enough to seal a fifth home win in a row for garry monks‘ side. it was an unhappy to return to his former club for
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derby's bradleyjohnson, who was sent off late on. it's a potentially decisive weekend in european club rugby union. irish side leinster are through to the quarter finals of the champions cup after a big win over montpellier last night. the french side had a man sent off in the first half, and leinster took full advantage — jack conan scored three of their eight tries in a 57—3 victory. bath also scored eight tries in their victory over local rivals bristol, in the second—tier challenge cup competition. england's semesa roko—duguni one of the scorers in a 57—22 win. britain's dan evans will play in his first atp tour final this morning. he's due on court against gilles muller at around 8.30 at the sydney international. yesterday he beat andrey kuznetsov in three sets to reach the final. the first grand slam of the calendar, the australian open, starts on monday. traditionally, motorcross
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is an outdoor sport, given that it involves racing motorbikes overs hills and through mud. but now it's come inside, and this weekend riders as young as ten are competing in the arena cross event in glasgow, for the second leg of the uk championship. i've been finding out more. take a load of soil, dump it in an arena, and shape it into bumps and jumps and you have the championship that's opening up the great indoors to the world's motocross riders. it is attracting sell—out crowds up and down the country. we have 3000 tonnes of dirt on the floor, so it is rock ‘n' roll sport. that is how i try and explain it. there will be seven legs in places like this
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throughout the winter. from young riders are to the age of, what, 35, 30 six. having seen those pile—ups, and imagine being a dad watching your son is competing against each other. that is the case for richard jones this season, and his two lads, who have been riding since they were poon who have been riding since they were poor. everything is dangerous, to an extent. it is a nightmare, they are competitive, so let's hope they both finish in one piece. not many kids will be able to do this in front of so will be able to do this in front of so many people. it'sjust incredible. on the same track as some of the world's top motocross riders, chasing the £100,000 prize, racing almost on top of each other, it's more intense than the outdoor version of the sport. outdoors, it isa version of the sport. outdoors, it is a bigger track, version of the sport. outdoors, it is a biggertrack, so version of the sport. outdoors, it is a bigger track, so the racing is not as close. it is 18 laps, such
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high—intensity, short laps. not as close. it is 18 laps, such high-intensity, short laps. everyone is on top of it. it is accessible and exciting. on an outdoor track, you could be on one call corner and miss all the action on another. how would a novice handle the action? the bike is a bit bigger than me. let's see if i can get on, first. i know it is only a 250 cc, but it is one of the most powerful and valuable bikes. they are holding on for dear life, they do not want it to end up in the last row! it is so powerful, this machine, that he is leading me like a horse ornately brain. it'll take a lot more coaching before i get the call—up for the team, and i would have to do
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a few more hours in the gym to deal with the bone crunching thrills and spills of this sport. by sunday night, it's all gone again. i have been on the hunt for a pig squid. they do exist. we cannot show the picture because we would be infringing their privacy rights. it does look like a pig's face combined with a squid's body. we will work around the rights issue and see if we can come up with a picture later. for a budding young rock photographer, the late 19705 was an exciting time to try to launch a career. mike searle was just 17 when he took a cheap camera to a 1979 gig by thejam.
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the snaps he took didn't make it into the press, and he forgot all about them. but decades later, his dream came true and they've ended up on an album cover. john danks has the story. the jam on top of the pops in november, 1979. when mike searle went to see them play live in aylesbury later that month, he took along his russian—made zenit camera. it was an amazing gig, they were an amazing band to see live. paul weller used to leap around his with guitar so what i wanted to do was catch him jumping with his guitar, because that was his signature move. i managed to get that. lacking confidence, mike didn't do anything with them. the pictures didn't see the light of day again until a few years ago. wanting to set up as a freelance photographer, mike dug them out, put them online and then he got a call.
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someone from universal music called me up and said, we'd like your photos and we'd like to use them on a live album we're releasing from the same year, are you interested? and i was, like, yes i am. a deal was done and six months later the finished album was posted to him. i got the package and open it up and it was shiny, heavy, a beautiful piece of art. i would have done it for love to be honest. so teenage dreams that finally came true 38 years later. i really wanted to thank 17—year—old mike for earning me a little bit of money. the message to other people that age, if you got the time, the message to other people that age, if you got a talent follow your passion and really follow it through and good
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things can happen. john danks, bbc news, newquay. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. the main stories this morning: gp surgeries in england have been told by downing street they must stay open longer or risk losing funding. towns and villages along england's east coast have a skate flooding after a change in wind direction prevented a storm surge. we mentioned the weather, let's find out exactly what is happening from louise. that's a lovely picture. good morning. the cloud is gathering a little today in cornwall. it is milder here, around five or six celsius. lots of clear skies, but it is cold, temperatures around freezing in suffolk. a few sharp showers as well. there could be icy stretches where the showers are falling. the showers are just gathering on that
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north—westerly breeze, moving through the isle of man and north—west england. they should start to ease away as we go through the day, but there will always be a bit of a west— east divide. the east will be clear, with sunshine, but cold. in the west, there will be rain. the winds will continue to drive ina rain. the winds will continue to drive in a few showers, some of them in organised bands of rain. 7— eights lcs —— eight celsius in the west. as soon as we get to darkness, clear skies, a touch of early frost before rain and on the leading edge of it, perhaps a spell of snow as it
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bumps into that cold air. a real change starting to show its hand as we move into sunday. mild to the west, cold into the north. it is this milder air that will gradually sink south and east through the day tomorrow. it will take its time, so there could be a spell of wet snow across lincolnshire, east anglia and the south—east for a time. we are not to concern because it will turn readily back to rain. it will be a damp and drizzly kind of day. mild out to the west, maybe 10—11dc for some. to celsius in east anglia. get out and enjoy the sunshine you got at the moment. nearly three million couples are missing out on more than £200 discount off their income tax. married couples and civil partners can claim the marriage allowance if one pays no tax and the other is not on a high income. 18 months since it was introduced, two out of three eligible couples
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have still not claimed it. paul lewis from radio 4's moneybox programme has been looking into this and joins us now from our london newsroom. is from our london newsroom. it easy to claim? is th that is it easy to claim? is the problem that people find it too difficult to claim? you claim on the government website, do a search for marriage allowa nce, website, do a search for marriage allowance, and there is the claim form. it was difficult at the start, which put people off, but now it is very simple. they need your national insurance number, date of birth and some kind of identification. it is easy to claim, and the problem, i think, is that people simply don't know about it. it does sound straightforward. in terms of getting people to do this now, it is simply a case of needing a few details. how quickly will they get the money? they will get it quickly. the important thing is, if you are in a
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married couple or a civil partnership, one of you pays no tax and the other one doesn't pay higher rate tax, so an income below £43,000, you can get this marriage allowa nce. £43,000, you can get this marriage allowance. that is the thing to think. it is worth £220 off your tax bill. if you claim now, it will happen almost at once. it will come off your next pay your pension payment. you will get the whole lot of that first brought the whole of the last tax year in the current one. that will be around £300 off your tax in one month. then it will be £18 or so a month going into the future. well worth doing, very simple. free money from the government. that's not a bad thing. what does hmrc say on this? they say
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that 1.3 million people have claimed. that means nearly 3 million people haven't. they told me yesterday that the claim is simple and it encourages people to claim, and it encourages people to claim, and people are successfully claiming every day. anyone who thinks they may be eligible — couples with moderate incomes, one of whom doesn't pay tax — they should be doing. once breakfast has finished, of course, go and claim online. there are so many different allowa nces there are so many different allowances and things out there, it can be confusing for people to know what is relevant to them and what isn't. absolutely. if you are over 82, you will find there is a different married couples allowance that you can get. it is worth a lot more, and you can't get them both. so that is a complexity. there are complexities everywhere in tax system. that is one reason people don't
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claim. they think, oh, it will be too difficult. this really isn't. this will be on your programme today at midday. moneybox, today at noon on radio 4. see you later, paul. it's nearly a month since the professional dancer, joanne clifton, lifted the famous glitterball when she waltzed her way to becoming joint winner in strictly come dancing, and now she's swapping the ballroom for the stage. next week she takes the lead as a new york flapper in the musical ‘thoroughly modern millie'. phillip norton caught up with her in rehearsals. a few weeks ago, it was strictly
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crowning glory forjoanne clifton. but while ore's gruelling training may be over for now, his mental is ha rd may be over for now, his mental is hard at work. she has swapped blackpool and dance floors for the stage, finding herfeet as millie. blackpool and dance floors for the stage, finding her feet as millie.|j don't sing or speak. dancing wise, you are there and you perform it. this time, you have to perform it 360 degrees, with the acting, singing and dancing. it is quite different, quite manic, but it has been a childhood dream of mine. more than 13 million people watched as the celebrity pair were awarded the
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glitter ball before christmas. joann beating her big brother kevin in his fourth final. everyone saw your reaction when your name was announced with ore as the winner. how did you feel? well, we didn't expect it in the slightest. she seems to read our names are pretty quick, and i wasjust like, what? i can't remember anything after that, apart from i think my brother picked me up, spun me around, then i went towards the glitter ball, and i remember nearly fainting. i didn't hear what ore said. i was thinking, iam going hear what ore said. i was thinking, i am going to faint on live tv — keep calm, breed! joann was cast in the musical last summer. it is the story of a girl who travels to new york to follow her dreams, similar
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to howjoann york to follow her dreams, similar to how joann left york to follow her dreams, similar to howjoann left grimsby at 16 and moved to italy for a career in dance. i can relate to it because the musical starts with me turning round, arriving off the train in new york, looking around and being excited and nervous at the same time. i remember that moment, getting off the aeroplane in bologna in italy, on my own, going, ok, this is great, but what now? following yourdream, is great, but what now? following your dream, the dancing dream. yeah. with that dream now a firm reality, she has been playing catch up with the rest of the cast of thoroughly modern millie, who had to dance without her. i was rooting for her, but at the same time, i was thinking, i need to have in the rehearsal room. she rises to every challenge. she has been fantastic to
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work with. it is exciting. i get a real buzz, performing live on getting an audience reaction. if you say a line and they laugh, or they gasp, you get a buzz from that. i think it's going to be amazing. joann hopes to defend her strictly crown later in the year, but for now, it is nearly on her mind. curtain up is in wimbledon on tuesday. it just makes itjust makes you want to dance when you see things like that, doesn't it? not you, clearly! we will take a detailed look through the inside of the day's papers, coming up. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and steph mcgovern. the prime minister says gps in england must extend their hours
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to ease pressure on accident and emergency services. theresa may says funding to doctors will be cut if they don't provide a 12 hour, seven day service or prove that it isn't needed. good morning. it's saturday, 14th january. also ahead, thousands of people have been evacuated from their homes, but towns and villages along the east coast escape serious flooding. mps call for the government to publish its brexit plan by mid—february at the latest.
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